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December 19, 2019

Vintage Photos Capture the Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial in the Late 1940s

The Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial is one of the longest-running recognitions of Native American culture and art of the United States. First launched on September 28, 1922, it has been continuously taking place in Gallup, New Mexico for nearly a century. Featuring events embedded deep in Native American culture, it has inspired similar gatherings across the Southwest. Here are the scenes of the event at the late 1940s, taken by the renowned photographer Ivan Dmitri:

A view of the Native American campgrounds.

A Native American woman cooks by the campfire.

A Native American woman and her two children at the campgrounds.

A Native American woman and her two children at the campgrounds.

A Native American child sits by his teepee at the campgrounds.

A Native American woman trades pelts.

A Native American chief poses for a photo on his horse.

A Native American chief poses for a photo.

Two Native American men smoke a pipe in their teepee at the campgrounds.

Two Native American men smoke a pipe in their teepee at the campgrounds.

Pueblo women (probably from the Zuni tribe) bake bread.

Pueblo women (probably from the Zuni tribe) bake bread.

Members of a tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Acoma tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Jemez tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Navajo tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Zuni tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Mescalero Apache tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Mescalero Apache tribe participate in the parade.

Members of the Shivwitz Paiute tribe participate in the parade.

A member of the Navajo tribe participates in the parade.

A member of the Shivwitz Paiute tribe participates in the parade.

A member of a tribe participates in the parade.

A member of a tribe participates in the parade.

Native Americans from a tribe do a ceremonial dance.

Members of the Shivwitz Paiute tribe show off their prowess with a bow and arrow.

Dancers from the Mescalero Apache tribe participate in the Devil Dance.

Dancers from the Mescalero Apache tribe participate in the Devil Dance.

Dancers from the Mescalero Apache tribe participate in the Devil Dance.

Native Americans (possibly from the Lakota Sioux tribe) blow Eagle bone Whistles while participating in the Sun Dance.

A Native American (possibly from the Lakota Sioux tribe) blows Eagle bone Whistles while participating in the Sun Dance.




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